Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Media Ethics a Nicety Not Supported by Print Media Bottom Line?







Unverified but alleged crack cocaine phantom video hearsay and apparently viewed in the back seat of a car as suggested by Toronto Star employees for their alleged story DOES NOT MEET the SMELL TEST of RELIABILITY! 

However it does sell newspapers in the media’s never ending attempt of character assassination politically directed at Toronto’s Mayor Ford!

So called journalists or reports and their media bosses know that what they are doing is reckless and shows no respect for their readers or the public in general.

It has become more than obvious to all Canadians that ethics within print media today is a nicety that their bottom line cannot afford! 

According to one Rosie DiManno of the Toronto Star journalistic ethics regarding printing and reprinting of unverifiable alleged allegations of unverifiable video audio stories from self proclaimed drug dealers supposedly involving Toronto’s Mayor Ford on the sole word of two Toronto Star employees it’s “Ethis Shmethics”!

Jonathan Kay from the National Post is no better.

His latest story article, based on this phantom video supposedly provided by crack cocaine drug dealers on a staged video for profit from the proceeds of crime which is an illegal offense in Canada to Toronto Star reports, insinuates without any proof whatsoever that Toronto’s Mayor Ford is a crack head who should leave office before being proven guilty of any offense in a court of law?

Unless this guy Kay has some substantiated and verified law enforcement backed legal and factual proof for his libelous and defamatory remarks about Mayor Ford he could be in a heap of legal trouble.

Perhaps now Toronto lawyer Clayton Ruby in the interests of the public and law enforcement might come to the defense of Toronto’s Mayor on a pro bono basis in the interest of fair play, transparency and of course the public good like he has done and claimed to represent in the past?  

In my opinion these two Toronto Star employees who broke this story about the Mayor have some unanswered questions that need answering in the interests’ of law enforcement, journalistic ethics and accountability for their actions.

The Star’s very questionable, unverified and dubious story shall remain as such in the minds and eyes of public opinion until these two reporters and employees of the Toronto Star come clean and confessed to the motives behind their dealings with drug dealers and criminal types.

As such for profit schemes that are based on unverified and phantom video movies and hearsay recordings as to he said she said allegations for a very questionable, unverifiable dubious headline story and follow-up articles to increase circulation is NOT journalism in Canada. And as such it must be investigated by the proper legal authorities for the protection of all public or private citizens.

Peter Clarke 
Toronto 
clarketoronto@gmail.com 



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Thanks for your thoughts, comments and opinions, will be in touch. Peter Clarke